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Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Six of our Ranch and Recreational Brokers were awarded the following and were recognized at Prudential Real Estate’s Sales Convention held in Nashville, TN, March 16-18. The annual business event was attended by real estate professionals from the United States, Mexico and Canada. 


Big Sky Real EstateDon Pilotte, Broker of Prudential Montana Real Estate has been named to the prestigious Prudential Real Estate Honor Society for 2013. This award recognizes the top 10% of all residential sales professionals who exemplified great sales performance.

Broker in Montana
Bryan Atwell, Broker, CRS, GRI of Prudential Montana Real Estate has been named to the prestigious Prudential Real Estate Leading Edge Society for 2013. This award recognizes the top 7% of all residential sales professionals who exemplified great sales performance


Buy land in MontanaRanches in Montana

FrankColwell, Managing Broker and Dan Reddick, Broker with Prudential Montana Real Estate has been named to the prestigious Prudential Real Estate President’s Circle for 2013. This award recognizes the top 3% of all residential sales professionals who exemplified great sales performance.


Dillon Real EstateDillon Real Estate
ChanceBernall, Managing Broker and Keith Handlos, Sales Associate of Prudential Montana Real Estate have been named to the prestigious Prudential Real Estate Chairman’s Circle Gold for 2013. The award recognizes the top 2 % of all residential sales professionals who exemplified great sales performance.



That so many of our Ranch & Recreational group members were honored as among the top 2-10 percent of the entire Prudential Real Estate Network is to be commended. And for some of these fellas this is just another award to add to their collection of previous achievements. Congratulations! We're honored to have you on our team. 


 



Monday, March 31, 2014

Fun Facts About the Food We Eat




Now that National Ag Week is behind us, I hope all of you hugged a farmer for the food he/she puts on your plate.  I have a personal affection for farmers and ranchers, since our family is a four generation ranching operation. I grew up in the family who made the Madison County Fair their summer vacation and named all their 4-H animals, cried when they sold them and then started the process all over again the next year. We carted everything from zucchini cake to horses to the 4-H County Fair to compete for the coveted grand prize.

As our schools and community celebrated last week, I searched for some fun facts on agriculture and came up with the following facts about the food we eat.


Corn Poppin’ Facts
Popcorn pops because water is stored in a small circle of soft starch in each kernel. As the kernel is heated, the water heats, the droplet of moisture turns to steam and the steam builds up pressure until the kernel finally explodes to many times its original volume.  Americans today consume 17.3 billion quarts of popped popcorn each year! The average American eats about 68 quarts.

Cherrific!
The same chemicals that give tart cherries their color may relieve pain better than aspirin and ibuprofen in humans. Eating about 20 tart cherries a day could reduce inflammation pain and headache pain. There are about 7,000 cherries on an average tart cherry tree. It takes about 250 cherries to make a cherry pie, so each tree can produce about 250 pies.

Head Strong
Lettuce is a member of the sunflower family. Darker green lettuce leaves are more nutritious than lighter green leaves.  Americans eat about 30 pounds of lettuce every year. That’s about 5 times more than we ate n the early 1900’s.

Berry, Berry Good for You!
Blueberries are the second most popular berry in the US. Michigan and New Jersey produce 66% of all blueberries in the US, followed by North Carolina, Oregon and Washington. Over 200 million pounds of blueberries are grown every year in North America. Blueberries are a good source of Vitamin C and fiber.

Cracking Up
In the US in 1998, hens produced 6,657,000,000 dozen eggs-that’s 6.667 billion dozen! The egg shell may have as many as 17,000 tiny pores over its surface. Through them, the egg can absorb flavors and odors.  Therefore storing them in cartons keeps them fresh. Eggs age more in one day at room temperature than in one week in the refrigerator. Egg yolks are one of the few foods that naturally contain Vitamin D.

Going Bananas
There are over 500 different types of bananas. Although regarded as a tree, this large tropical plant is really an herb. That means it does not have a woody trunk like a tree. The stalk is composed of leaf sheaths that overlap each other and grow from an underground stem called a rhizome. Bananas are about 99.5% fat free and were most likely the first fruit ever to be grown on a farm.

Pizza Perfect
Americans eat approximately 100 acres of pizza each day or 350 slices per second.  Each man, woman and child in America eats an average of 46 slices (23 pounds) of pizza a year. Pepperoni is America’s favorite topping. Anchovies always rank the last on the list of favorite toppings. In 1830 pizza truly began with the opening of the world’s first pizzeria. Port’ Alba, the pizzas were cooked in an oven lined with lava from Mount Vesuvius, a volcano located on the Bay of Naples



ALC, GRI, RRS, SRS

Tuesday, March 25, 2014

Celebrate National Ag Day



National Ag Day  March 25th is a day to recognize and celebrate the abundance provided by agriculture. Every year, producers, agricultural associations, corporations, universities, government agencies and countless others across America join together to recognize the contributions of agriculture.

Today, while you're out and about, take time to consider where your food comes from. Better yet, thank a farmer or rancher for their contributions to our society. 


ACA (The Agriculture Council of America) believes that every American should:

  • Understand how food and fiber products are produced.
  • Appreciate the role agriculture plays in providing safe, abundant and affordable products.
  • Value the essential role of agriculture in maintaining a strong economy.
  • Acknowledge and consider career opportunities in the agriculture, food and fiber industry.

The Prudential Montana Ranch & Recreational Group is proud to represent the land sector of Agriculture in our beautiful state. We encourage you to browse or current inventory of Montana Farms & Ranches. Contact one of our experienced Ag Brokers today.




Monday, March 10, 2014

Montana Snowpack 2014



Excellent Water Supply Outlook



By: Brian Domonkos, NRCS, 
Water Supply Specialist, MT  


Stellar is a perfect word to describe February’s snowpack, precipitation accumulation, and the stream flow forecasts for March 1, according to a water supply forecaster with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). Over the course of February, the Judith Basin was the only watershed in the state of Montana with a decrease in snowpack of all analyzed basins. 

According to SNOTEL and snow course observation sites, statewide snowpack increased 20 percent.  Precipitation saw nearly the same increments.  Both precipitation and  snowpack currently in place are the two major drivers of stream flow forecasts. Despite a few sub-basins showing deficient water supply forecasts, nearly all forecast points showed improvement since last month’s projections.   

“February turned out to be one of the most plentiful snow accumulation months on record,”  said Brian Domonkos, NRCS water supply specialist for Montana.  “To say that Mother Nature took great strides to improve Montana’s snowpack would be an understatement in most areas.” 

Of the two basins that had below median snowpack last month, both now possess average or above average snowpack. On March 1, 2014, the Kootenai Mainstem was the only sub-basin that remained below median at 92 percent.  The mountainous areas between Toston, Mont., and Great Falls, Mont.,—known as Missouri Mainstem basin—received the greatest boost in the state.  With a 38 percent increase, the Missouri Mainstem basin had  record snowpack levels of 163 percent of median.  

Snow Water Content

River Basin
% of Median
% of Last Year
Columbia
124
135
     Kootenai
102
106
     Flathead
116
126
     Upper Clark Fork
140
155
     Bitterroot
146
174
     Lower Clark Fork
118
125
Missouri
131
136
     Missouri Headwaters
124
130
          Jefferson
136
141
          Madison
112
121
          Gallatin
121
122
     Missouri Mainstem
146
148
          Headwaters Mainstem
163
163
          Smith-Judith Musselshell
147
149
          Sun-Teton-Marias
133
143
          Milk
151
128
St. Mary
112
108
St. Mary & Milk
125
115
Yellowstone
141
156
     Upper Yellowstone
143
156
     Lower Yellowstone
140
157
Statewide
130
140

Reservoir storage is in excellent standing across the state, according to NRCS.  Daily SNOTEL data is showing that more than half of the watersheds have already reached normal snowpack peak levels, which are typically achieved between mid-April and mid-May.  “Provided warm temperatures do not melt mountain snow during the next two months, below normal snowpack accumulation would likely still yield near normal peak snowpack in most basins,” Domonkos said.  Currently, snowpack is better than 2011 levels in 8 of 14 basins. 

“Keep in mind, with one-fifth of the snowpack accumulation season remaining, deviation from current percentages is probable,” Domonkos said.   “In perspective to the last two years in Montana and the current conditions in the far south and western United States, Montana is in excellent standing for spring and summer runoff.”

Due to the snowpack received this February, nearly all streamflow predictions for this spring and summer improved since February 1..  Domonkos said that although most areas of the state made game-changing improvements in snowpack, the Red Rocks and Ruby (above the reservoir) Rivers still maintain below average snowpacks.  Located in the upper Jefferson, the current snowpacks in these areas will likely lead to below normal streamflow prospects without above average snow accumulation in the coming months.

The Big Hole River, Dillon MT
Streamflow Forecasts

Below are the averaged River Basin streamflow forecasts for the period April 1 through July 31. THESE FORECASTS ASSUME NEAR NORMAL MOISTURE AND RUNOFF CONDITIONS APRIL THROUGH JULY.


April-July Streamflow Forecast Period

River Basin
Forecast as
% of Normal
This Year Forecast as % of Last Year Streamflow
Columbia
112
114
     Kootenai
90
75
     Flathead
104
94
     Upper Clark Fork
148
183
     Bitterroot
145
189
     Lower Clark Fork
123
132
Missouri
121
169
     Missouri Headwaters
114
203
          Jefferson
122
272
          Madison
98
136
          Gallatin
110
154
     Missouri Mainstem
122
161
          Headwaters Mainstem
122
164
          Smith-Judith Musselshell
173
327
          Sun-Teton-Marias
111
121
          Milk
114
Incomplete
St. Mary
97
90
St. Mary & Milk
99
90
Yellowstone
127
168
     Upper Yellowstone
118
150
     Lower Yellowstone
134
183
Statewide
117
133